Wednesday, December 2, 2015

Steps to Protect Your Moringa Trees for The Winter



Since winter is just around the corner, you need to think about helping your Moringa seedlings survive the winter ahead.  I love my trees so the extra effort is worth it. I also have Neem trees as well. My back room looks like a plant nursery with Neem starts, Moringa trees, Scented Geraniums, and dwarf Mulberry starts, but they all give me great joy.  Some of them will get sold next Spring.

Steps to Protect Your Moringa Trees


#1: If you get frost or freezing temps, bring the pot in the house by the sunniest window you have. They do not take frost or freezing temps.  In cold areas with nasty winters, keeping it in the house is one of the only options.  I know some folks who have a room in their house or basement where they raise sprouts and other winter veggies. I am growing Swiss Chard this winter in our back room.  I am also going to try a Comfrey plant as well. I use a special plant grow light to increase the lighting for the plants. Commercial grow lights work as well.

Pet Warning:  Your cats/dogs/rabbits will eat your tree down to the roots. Our trees are kept in our back room where the cats cannot access.

#2:   If you live in California or Florida where it does not freeze, move your potted seedlings where they won't get continually drenched with water. Give them protection from heavy winds as well. They need to dry out between watering. Here it rains several days in a row. They will get root rot.  If the tree is in the ground, try to add drainage ditches to divert water away from the tree roots.  Don't let it sit in water. Do not mulch them for that keeps the area around the tap root too wet.

If it is in the ground in an area that freezes, try building a supporting structure over and around it, then apply heavy duty 6 mil plastic around that structure. I would use two layers depending on the area and the cold.

#4: Your tree will probably lose its leaves if the temperature does not stay around 60 to 70 degrees. It may look dead but probably is not.  If the tap root is firm, it is fine. If the tap root feels mushy, that means root rot.

#5: Don't over water your Moringa tree or fertilize it while it is dormant and in the house.  It is easy to kill your trees and other houseplants with too much water.

#6:  If you can't put the tree in the house, put it in the garage or basement. Those two areas might be warm enough to keep the tree from freezing. It depends on the area.  You can wrap Christmas lights around the base of the tree to raise the temperature some. That has been done and it worked in some areas.  A heated greenhouse would work.


I hope this helps you to save your Moringa seedlings. If not, plant them for your spring and summer garden, letting them freeze when winter sets in.


NOTICE:

I do not sell Moringa products as of Sept, 2016. I am working on a project that demands an unbiased viewpoint. 

If you want to buy from my favorite herb, vitamins, and supplement companies. visit my store here


Kate Freer, the Herbladyisin






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